Does it matter if a developer is free and open-source?



  • If a developer asked you to pay once, pay for a subscription, pay for add-ons, pay to unlock features, pay to use more, pay to use longer, or just pay for something. Would you do it?

    If they didn’t ask you to pay, and it was free and open-source, which are you more likely to support?

    Before you answer I’d like for you to take into consideration that the developers that asked you to pay are probably just trying to make a living themselves like everyone else.



  • If a developer asked you to pay once, pay for a subscription, pay for add-ons, pay to unlock features, pay to use more, pay to use longer, or just pay for something. Would you do it?

    If they didn’t ask you to pay, and it was free and open-source, which are you more likely to support?

    Before you answer I’d like for you to take into consideration that the developers that asked you to pay are probably just trying to make a living themselves like everyone else.



  • It depends on if what the developer’s developing is worth the money, for me anyway.


  • Administrators

    In my opinion the best business model here is to create open software and provide (non-exclusive) services for it such as customization, hosting or whatever. You get money and end-users don’t have to pay a dime. Hell, they can even improve upon your implementation.

    If the software couldn’t require any services or you’re too lazy to offer services, release it as nagware (annoying prompts if not licensed, require professional/commercial use to have a license).

    If the software can’t be open-source or nagware (like a training tool, a video game with no replay value or something like that) then release it as traditional pay-to-use software.

    In any case, only offer subscriptions if there is an underlying service that requires an upkeep. Asking for monthly payments for an essentially stagnant application is insane.

    “Donationware” doesn’t seem like a very good way to make a living (see http://www.wavosaur.com/ , an excellent audio tool) unless you provide some kind of an underlying service that requires upkeep or new content (http://www.freedomainradio.com/ and various video game servers come to mind).

    @Mal1t1a:

    Before you answer I’d like for you to take into consideration that the developers that asked you to pay are probably just trying to make a living themselves like everyone else.

    Buying software isn’t charity. I give money in exchange for something concrete of equivalent value. If the software is too expensive or requires a subscription where none is due, I’ll likely go find an alternative or even pirate it.



  • If Google Drive, Google Documents, iScribble, YouTube, Dropbox, and i.lexsym.com (personal imge hosting service website) were combined, then it should be Donationware, right?


  • Administrators

    Sounds like Dropbox’s web interface but considering that it has a hosting upkeep you could adopt Google’s and Dropbox’s business model of “X free space, subscribe for more”.



  • Read or listen to Stallman’s presentations, he has some good points about monetization with Free Open Source software


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