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Nukkun's TL;DR & Visual guide to maeking caed ( WIP )



  • This thread is where the big guide I’m making will live.  I was going to finish the whole thing before making a thread, but it will be much easier for me to format it if I leave the guide as a WIP and add images/video as I go with the post preview.  Feel free to suggest things you think should be covered, but bear in mind this is a work in progress and I’m going to go over plenty of subjects.  Barricading is abstract and there is no tell-all, but I hope to maybe convey some of my experience.  I will partially be using Codebrain’s unfinished barricade tutorial as a template, so all subjects that are not outdated present here (http://pastebin.com/F8R81Tif) will be covered.  The majority of the guide will be conceptual, with examples of barricades that illustrate various topics such as layering, ease of repair, and advanced prop manipulation.

    I promise I’ll make it pretty later.

    Barricading in Zombie Survival has become more complicated over time.  In years past, a single prop could be sufficient for the entirety of a game.  The system today is far more intricate, and requires skill in quickly manipulating props, the general understanding of the game to place them in appropriate locations, and the patience of a saint.

    [header]Loadout[/header]

    Four options specific to barricading are available in the worth menu, three in ‘Tools’ and one under ’ Other.’  For 125 points, an Aegis barricade kit can be purchased mid-game. It is recommended that when you decide to barricade, you select a loadout completely dedicated to doing so, as you will be expected to spend the majority of the game repairing your work, as well as that of your teammates.

    Carpenter’s Hammer

    The one thing absolutely necessary to creating a barricade.  Available in the worth menu for 45 and the point shop for 50, the hammer comes with twelve nails by default.  Its most useful property is its attack2, which consumes one nail to attach a prop to whatever prop is directly behind it, up to a certain distance away.  This nail can be removed with the reload key (default R).  The hammer’s attack1 will repair the damaged, nailed prop it strikes for 10 points of its health, and do 30 damage to zombies. In almost all situations it is better to repair with every swing.  You are not able to defend your barricade by yourself.  If nobody is present at a barricade that is being attacked, call for help.  Having a microphone is important when barricading.  You will almost never need to purchase a hammer mid-game, since as a licensed and certified barricader, you’ll be expected to get one every round anyway.

    The other three options are situational.

    Box of 12 6 Nails

    This contains six nails for 25 worth.  Usually a good choice- having plenty of nails is very important for several reasons.

    Junk Pack

    For 40 worth, the junk pack comes with three ‘boards’, which is the type of ammo used both to spawn props and use Aegis.  The pack will spawn props at random from those pictured below.

    Handy [ Needs further testing. ]

    With the Handy perk, you repair at 125% the normal rate.  Fractions rounded down when the prop’s remaining health is displayed.  The increased repair rate is especially useful when few people are repairing, or at lower player counts.

    There is also one craftable item for barricade makers- namely,

    The Electro Hammer.

    To craft an item in ZS, you must drop the weapon next to the craftable prop ( In this case, a Carpenter’s hammer and a car battery, both shown below ) , then hold alt, left click one, and right click the other.  What comes out is a superior weapon, in this case, a hammer that repairs at 140% the normal rate.  If you are on a map where an electro hammer can be crafted, selecting handy can make a big difference, as the 25% bonus makes the Electro Hammer repair at 175% the efficiency of a Carpenter’s Hammer.

    [header]Barricading - Important Concepts[/header]

    Preventing Zombies From Entering

    This is what your barricade is for.  When it is no longer able to do this, the barricade has failed.  If it didn’t prevent entry to begin with, it was a failure from the start.

    Repairability

    Every prop used in the barricade proper should be repairable from a relatively safe location.  A useful prop that cannot be repaired will inevitably be destroyed.

    Shooting Angles

    A barricade that cannot be shot out of is absolutely useless.  There are three areas that should always have a clear and open line of fire for humans-  Head height for zombies/bloated zombies/ghouls, Head height for poison zombies / fast zombies, and the floor.  The more space there is available to shoot, the more effectively humans can defend.  Pictured below are the zones that should always be open to gunfire.

    [ image ]

    [header]Props[/header]

    Props fall into four categories.  Small props, which can be lifted and rotated freely, large props, which can be dragged around and flipped with significant effort, awkward props that are frequently massive and can only be interacted with in complicated ways which will be explained later, and static props, which are part of the environment.  Almost all props can be destroyed in one fashion or another, although some can only be damaged with guns, and certain objects ( usually pre-made barricades present in the map ) can only take damage from zombies.

    Props have health points based on their size. The maximum health a prop can have is 1100.  Naturally, due to the correlation between size and health, props with maximum hp are typically considered ‘large’, and cannot be moved freely.  One notable exception is the large, rectangular wooden crate.

    The most important attribute of a prop is its shape.  This determines how much of an area the prop can cover at once, and how many props can be effectively placed directly behind it.

    It is important to note that if two props are nailed together, they can no longer be picked up, even if each is very small.

    Prop Storage

    A common practice is to nail props to the ceiling, in order to protect props from the players, and players from the props.  A nailed prop cannot take damage from humans under any circumstances, so nailing down spare props ensures they are protected from griefing or thoughtless attacks. In addition, this frees up floor space for deployables, and gives humans more room to walk around and shoot.  It also allows you to quickly find a needed prop when the time comes to reinforce the barricade, or replace a critical component.

    [header]Small Props[/header]

    Positioning

    Small props can be picked up with the ‘Use’ key (Default E) and rotated by holding down the ‘Walk’ key (Default ALT) and moving the mouse in the direction you wish it to rotate.  However, this is not always ideal. More often than not, props are most effective when their edges are parallel to the opening they are covering.  This is because at off angles, uneven coverage can result in leaks both of headcrabs and of crouched zombies.  It is generally best to keep props a small distance from other props and surfaces (like the floor), as this allows them to block as much as is possible.

    [image  - comparison ]

    Squaring Up

    The easiest way to make your prop stand at a right angle is to gently move it into a corner, then square it up where the wall meets the floor.  the prop will remain oriented in this fashion until it contacts another surface or prop.

    Layering

    This is what makes barricades last.  A layered barricade will not fail until multiple props have been broken.    Layering your barricade is why you need to place props as efficiently as possible.    To illustrate the importance of placement and efficiency, I will use only a single junk pack’s worth of props. For purposes of illustration, only regular zombies exist.

    The barricades below are equally strong.

    The reason for this is that each can be broken with the destruction of one prop- the table.

    The barricade below will prevent zombies from walking in, but it is possible to crouch-jump over it.  This means that another prop must be nailed overhead in order to prevent entry.

    This is where Layering comes in.  By combining the two most effective placements for these props to prevent zombies from walking in with a single obstacle overhead, the barricade ensures that zombies must destroy at least two props before they can enter- namely, either the table and the dresser behind it, or the table and the board overhead.  This means the barricade is twice as strong!

    Large Props - Important Concepts

    Positioning

    The way large props are positioned is very different.  When pressing Use, you create an anchor point.  Then, moving the mouse, you will stretch a ‘rope’ from that location.  The prop will try and drag the point you selected to the location the rope terminates at- namely, at your cursor. The ‘rope’ will break if it reaches a certain length.  Manipulating large props requires practice, as the majority are rectangular in shape and must be flipped multiple times to place in certain situations.
    Efficiently using the least props to cover the most space makes a barricade significantly stronger.

    If one person is between the prop and where you are trying to drag it, it won’t move at all.  Having a microphone is important when barricading.  You need to be able to tell people, by name, to get out of the way when moving large props.  Because of the difficulty in moving them, it is ideal to have all large props in place before zombies first spawn at all.    This means that any replacement prop should be right next to the one currently in use, in position to be quickly shoved into place when necessary.    A common strategy is to have the front layer of the barricade composed of a single large prop, which can then tank damage while the rest of the barricade is constructed.

    It is important to bear in mind that some props, such as shelves, are so large that headcrabs can actually walk through them.  Care must be taken to prevent this, but all that’s needed is a single small prop in each opening.

    The most common large props are metal tables, vending machines, and blue/grey shelves.    These can be divided into two categories- those that can be shot through, and those that cannot.  Large props that cannot be shot through have a tendency to greatly obstruct shooting angles.    Note how in the image below, zombies can only be shot at through extreme angles on either side of the vending machine.

    When there is an excess of large props, it can be beneficial to use more than one to barricade, even when a single one would block the same area.  This is done for two reasons:  To add shooting angles to the barricade , and to split zombie damage between props.  Even though the same amount of damage must be done to each barricade in order to break it,  in the second example zombies will each have to choose which prop to destroy, and neither is the obvious choice.  Zombies can also be shot with ease from much further away.

    Because it is best to have large props all in place before the game begins, shelves can be especially effective.  You can put them one in front of another without obstructing vision.  As a result, a full barricade can be placed behind  one, or even two.  In this example, two grey shelves are placed in front of one another, with a full barricade of benches behind them.  Everything is repairable.

    [header]More specific/advanced concepts[/header]

    These will require particular props in some cases, but all are tried-and-true ways to make a barricade stronger.  If the props are available, and the situation calls for it, some of the techniques below could serve you well.  Use your best judgement.

    Piano Cades

    The ‘Piano’ barricade resembles its musical namesake.  Formerly, in ZS, the Junk Pack was called a Board Pack.  It only spawned wooden boards of a uniform size- exactly right for this barricade.  Pianos are so potent that the pack had to be rebalanced. Each ‘bar’ should be as thin a prop as possible, but other than this, the materials don’t matter.  The important thing is to keep each perfectly straight,  so human players will have perfect vision of the killing zone.  To better illustrate what props are suitable for a piano, I’ve created one with ten ‘keys’ using a different kind of prop for each.

    Obby

    ‘Obby’ is a holdout term from an old mod, namely, Obby.  The objective was to make it through lengthy obstacle courses, and that’s what you want the zombies to do.      By nailing props in the killing zone, it’s possible to force zombies to take slightly longer paths or stop completely.  It is obviously impossible to repair these props, so if they start getting hit they won’t last long.    Using very small props solves this problem in two ways.  First, they are difficult to hit.  The smaller the prop, the more difficult it is for a zombie to strike it.  Second, they are essentially useless in a barricade.  There’s no reason not to try and irritate zombies with things like chinese take-out boxes, soda cans, and fruit. The most effective Obby is found on a stairwell zombies have to ascend.  Not only is Bonemesh incapable of damaging the props, but any zombies that try to hit them will be extremely easy to headshot from above- especially if they are crouching.  Below is an ideal setup.

    [header]Actually Barricading[/header]

    Your job begins the instant you load into the map and gain control.  Ideally, before the first zombie spawns, you will have done the following:

    • Figured out where on the map you are barricading.

    • Set up simple, easily reinforcable barricades on every entrance to that location.

    • Moved large props either to or very near their final destinations.

    • Communicated to the team what you are doing, where they need to be, and why.

    While this sounds like a tall order at first glance, especially considering the very brief time frame ( 1-2 minutes) you have to get it all done,  it’s important to remember that everything is situational.    No matter what you decide, communicate with the team.

    Some things to consider when just starting to set up:

    • Will the barricade be under pressure immediately? ( Experienced zombies, z spawn next to barricade entrance )

    • Are you likely to need a large amount of props?

    • Is the map suitable for human players to buy you time? ( Open map, plenty of visibility, room to run )



  • This thread is where the big guide I’m making will live.  I was going to finish the whole thing before making a thread, but it will be much easier for me to format it if I leave the guide as a WIP and add images/video as I go with the post preview.  Feel free to suggest things you think should be covered, but bear in mind this is a work in progress and I’m going to go over plenty of subjects.  Barricading is abstract and there is no tell-all, but I hope to maybe convey some of my experience.  I will partially be using Codebrain’s unfinished barricade tutorial as a template, so all subjects that are not outdated present here (http://pastebin.com/F8R81Tif) will be covered.  The majority of the guide will be conceptual, with examples of barricades that illustrate various topics such as layering, ease of repair, and advanced prop manipulation.

    I promise I’ll make it pretty later.

    Barricading in Zombie Survival has become more complicated over time.  In years past, a single prop could be sufficient for the entirety of a game.  The system today is far more intricate, and requires skill in quickly manipulating props, the general understanding of the game to place them in appropriate locations, and the patience of a saint.

    [header]Loadout[/header]

    Four options specific to barricading are available in the worth menu, three in ‘Tools’ and one under ’ Other.’  For 125 points, an Aegis barricade kit can be purchased mid-game. It is recommended that when you decide to barricade, you select a loadout completely dedicated to doing so, as you will be expected to spend the majority of the game repairing your work, as well as that of your teammates.

    Carpenter’s Hammer

    The one thing absolutely necessary to creating a barricade.  Available in the worth menu for 45 and the point shop for 50, the hammer comes with twelve nails by default.  Its most useful property is its attack2, which consumes one nail to attach a prop to whatever prop is directly behind it, up to a certain distance away.  This nail can be removed with the reload key (default R).  The hammer’s attack1 will repair the damaged, nailed prop it strikes for 10 points of its health, and do 30 damage to zombies. In almost all situations it is better to repair with every swing.  You are not able to defend your barricade by yourself.  If nobody is present at a barricade that is being attacked, call for help.  Having a microphone is important when barricading.  You will almost never need to purchase a hammer mid-game, since as a licensed and certified barricader, you’ll be expected to get one every round anyway.

    The other three options are situational.

    Box of 12 6 Nails

    This contains six nails for 25 worth.  Usually a good choice- having plenty of nails is very important for several reasons.

    Junk Pack

    For 40 worth, the junk pack comes with three ‘boards’, which is the type of ammo used both to spawn props and use Aegis.  The pack will spawn props at random from those pictured below.

    Handy [ Needs further testing. ]

    With the Handy perk, you repair at 125% the normal rate.  Fractions rounded down when the prop’s remaining health is displayed.  The increased repair rate is especially useful when few people are repairing, or at lower player counts.

    There is also one craftable item for barricade makers- namely,

    The Electro Hammer.

    To craft an item in ZS, you must drop the weapon next to the craftable prop ( In this case, a Carpenter’s hammer and a car battery, both shown below ) , then hold alt, left click one, and right click the other.  What comes out is a superior weapon, in this case, a hammer that repairs at 140% the normal rate.  If you are on a map where an electro hammer can be crafted, selecting handy can make a big difference, as the 25% bonus makes the Electro Hammer repair at 175% the efficiency of a Carpenter’s Hammer.

    [header]Barricading - Important Concepts[/header]

    Preventing Zombies From Entering

    This is what your barricade is for.  When it is no longer able to do this, the barricade has failed.  If it didn’t prevent entry to begin with, it was a failure from the start.

    Repairability

    Every prop used in the barricade proper should be repairable from a relatively safe location.  A useful prop that cannot be repaired will inevitably be destroyed.

    Shooting Angles

    A barricade that cannot be shot out of is absolutely useless.  There are three areas that should always have a clear and open line of fire for humans-  Head height for zombies/bloated zombies/ghouls, Head height for poison zombies / fast zombies, and the floor.  The more space there is available to shoot, the more effectively humans can defend.  Pictured below are the zones that should always be open to gunfire.

    [ image ]

    [header]Props[/header]

    Props fall into four categories.  Small props, which can be lifted and rotated freely, large props, which can be dragged around and flipped with significant effort, awkward props that are frequently massive and can only be interacted with in complicated ways which will be explained later, and static props, which are part of the environment.  Almost all props can be destroyed in one fashion or another, although some can only be damaged with guns, and certain objects ( usually pre-made barricades present in the map ) can only take damage from zombies.

    Props have health points based on their size. The maximum health a prop can have is 1100.  Naturally, due to the correlation between size and health, props with maximum hp are typically considered ‘large’, and cannot be moved freely.  One notable exception is the large, rectangular wooden crate.

    The most important attribute of a prop is its shape.  This determines how much of an area the prop can cover at once, and how many props can be effectively placed directly behind it.

    It is important to note that if two props are nailed together, they can no longer be picked up, even if each is very small.

    Prop Storage

    A common practice is to nail props to the ceiling, in order to protect props from the players, and players from the props.  A nailed prop cannot take damage from humans under any circumstances, so nailing down spare props ensures they are protected from griefing or thoughtless attacks. In addition, this frees up floor space for deployables, and gives humans more room to walk around and shoot.  It also allows you to quickly find a needed prop when the time comes to reinforce the barricade, or replace a critical component.

    [header]Small Props[/header]

    Positioning

    Small props can be picked up with the ‘Use’ key (Default E) and rotated by holding down the ‘Walk’ key (Default ALT) and moving the mouse in the direction you wish it to rotate.  However, this is not always ideal. More often than not, props are most effective when their edges are parallel to the opening they are covering.  This is because at off angles, uneven coverage can result in leaks both of headcrabs and of crouched zombies.  It is generally best to keep props a small distance from other props and surfaces (like the floor), as this allows them to block as much as is possible.

    [image  - comparison ]

    Squaring Up

    The easiest way to make your prop stand at a right angle is to gently move it into a corner, then square it up where the wall meets the floor.  the prop will remain oriented in this fashion until it contacts another surface or prop.

    Layering

    This is what makes barricades last.  A layered barricade will not fail until multiple props have been broken.    Layering your barricade is why you need to place props as efficiently as possible.    To illustrate the importance of placement and efficiency, I will use only a single junk pack’s worth of props. For purposes of illustration, only regular zombies exist.

    The barricades below are equally strong.

    The reason for this is that each can be broken with the destruction of one prop- the table.

    The barricade below will prevent zombies from walking in, but it is possible to crouch-jump over it.  This means that another prop must be nailed overhead in order to prevent entry.

    This is where Layering comes in.  By combining the two most effective placements for these props to prevent zombies from walking in with a single obstacle overhead, the barricade ensures that zombies must destroy at least two props before they can enter- namely, either the table and the dresser behind it, or the table and the board overhead.  This means the barricade is twice as strong!

    Large Props - Important Concepts

    Positioning

    The way large props are positioned is very different.  When pressing Use, you create an anchor point.  Then, moving the mouse, you will stretch a ‘rope’ from that location.  The prop will try and drag the point you selected to the location the rope terminates at- namely, at your cursor. The ‘rope’ will break if it reaches a certain length.  Manipulating large props requires practice, as the majority are rectangular in shape and must be flipped multiple times to place in certain situations.
    Efficiently using the least props to cover the most space makes a barricade significantly stronger.

    If one person is between the prop and where you are trying to drag it, it won’t move at all.  Having a microphone is important when barricading.  You need to be able to tell people, by name, to get out of the way when moving large props.  Because of the difficulty in moving them, it is ideal to have all large props in place before zombies first spawn at all.    This means that any replacement prop should be right next to the one currently in use, in position to be quickly shoved into place when necessary.    A common strategy is to have the front layer of the barricade composed of a single large prop, which can then tank damage while the rest of the barricade is constructed.

    It is important to bear in mind that some props, such as shelves, are so large that headcrabs can actually walk through them.  Care must be taken to prevent this, but all that’s needed is a single small prop in each opening.

    The most common large props are metal tables, vending machines, and blue/grey shelves.    These can be divided into two categories- those that can be shot through, and those that cannot.  Large props that cannot be shot through have a tendency to greatly obstruct shooting angles.    Note how in the image below, zombies can only be shot at through extreme angles on either side of the vending machine.

    When there is an excess of large props, it can be beneficial to use more than one to barricade, even when a single one would block the same area.  This is done for two reasons:  To add shooting angles to the barricade , and to split zombie damage between props.  Even though the same amount of damage must be done to each barricade in order to break it,  in the second example zombies will each have to choose which prop to destroy, and neither is the obvious choice.  Zombies can also be shot with ease from much further away.

    Because it is best to have large props all in place before the game begins, shelves can be especially effective.  You can put them one in front of another without obstructing vision.  As a result, a full barricade can be placed behind  one, or even two.  In this example, two grey shelves are placed in front of one another, with a full barricade of benches behind them.  Everything is repairable.

    [header]More specific/advanced concepts[/header]

    These will require particular props in some cases, but all are tried-and-true ways to make a barricade stronger.  If the props are available, and the situation calls for it, some of the techniques below could serve you well.  Use your best judgement.

    Piano Cades

    The ‘Piano’ barricade resembles its musical namesake.  Formerly, in ZS, the Junk Pack was called a Board Pack.  It only spawned wooden boards of a uniform size- exactly right for this barricade.  Pianos are so potent that the pack had to be rebalanced. Each ‘bar’ should be as thin a prop as possible, but other than this, the materials don’t matter.  The important thing is to keep each perfectly straight,  so human players will have perfect vision of the killing zone.  To better illustrate what props are suitable for a piano, I’ve created one with ten ‘keys’ using a different kind of prop for each.

    Obby

    ‘Obby’ is a holdout term from an old mod, namely, Obby.  The objective was to make it through lengthy obstacle courses, and that’s what you want the zombies to do.      By nailing props in the killing zone, it’s possible to force zombies to take slightly longer paths or stop completely.  It is obviously impossible to repair these props, so if they start getting hit they won’t last long.    Using very small props solves this problem in two ways.  First, they are difficult to hit.  The smaller the prop, the more difficult it is for a zombie to strike it.  Second, they are essentially useless in a barricade.  There’s no reason not to try and irritate zombies with things like chinese take-out boxes, soda cans, and fruit. The most effective Obby is found on a stairwell zombies have to ascend.  Not only is Bonemesh incapable of damaging the props, but any zombies that try to hit them will be extremely easy to headshot from above- especially if they are crouching.  Below is an ideal setup.

    [header]Actually Barricading[/header]

    Your job begins the instant you load into the map and gain control.  Ideally, before the first zombie spawns, you will have done the following:

    • Figured out where on the map you are barricading.

    • Set up simple, easily reinforcable barricades on every entrance to that location.

    • Moved large props either to or very near their final destinations.

    • Communicated to the team what you are doing, where they need to be, and why.

    While this sounds like a tall order at first glance, especially considering the very brief time frame ( 1-2 minutes) you have to get it all done,  it’s important to remember that everything is situational.    No matter what you decide, communicate with the team.

    Some things to consider when just starting to set up:

    • Will the barricade be under pressure immediately? ( Experienced zombies, z spawn next to barricade entrance )

    • Are you likely to need a large amount of props?

    • Is the map suitable for human players to buy you time? ( Open map, plenty of visibility, room to run )



  • Spring break has really gotten to you.



  • It’s this or emo poetry



  • Once completed make it a steam guide.


  • Banned

    TL;DR you should also try using your imagination and not always do the same cade in the same map.



  • Random props should be nailed in the adjacent rooms creating an obstacle course.



  • i dislike how you said “visual guide” and gave no actual examples of a well planned out barricade.



  • ’ WIP ’ means ’ Work In Progress ’ .



  • @Kramer:

    i dislike how you said “visual guide” and gave no actual examples of a well planned out barricade.

    @Pyramid:

    ’ WIP ’ means ’ Work In Progress ’ .

    It also says TL;DR.



  • I like it for now.  8)



  • plagarized from Sun’s PHD cading essay and his book on how to barricade.


  • Banned

    Why are you making guides that no one will ever read? This one even has tl;dr in the title…



  • Let him.  :P



  • @Pyramid:

    Handy

    With the Handy perk, striking a prop with your hammer will repair it for 15 points of damage rather than 10.  This is especially useful when few people are repairing, or at lower player counts.    While 5 points may not seem like much, remember that this is 150% the standard repair rate.  Two barricaders with Handy repair as quickly as three, and can make a prop tank damage from a single normal zombie until it can no longer be repaired.

    um, handy is only a 25% boost.



  • @ritzbits:

    um, handy is only a 25% boost.

    Thank you, I’ll do some testing and then update that section.



  • I know people don’t like it but if you prop a swinging door in the middle of the cade it works great at holding back the zombies.



  • @ManyStrongWords:

    I know people don’t like it but if you prop a swinging door in the middle of the cade it works great at holding back the zombies.

    This is a really, really good way to make people randomly explode into a shower of gibs.



  • As long as im on the inside I can care less about the others.  :biggrin:



  • Any opinions?


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